Nutrition for school sports

Nutrition helps provides vital fuel for physical activity, and it’s crucial that active children and adolescents consume well-balanced meals and snacks to help support school sports.

6754603d4ec0cfbeba712814e4d5d373Eating well for physical activity and sport can have many benefits including:

  • Increased energy and improved sporting performance
  • Reduced risk of injury
  • Better recovery after exercise

School-age children (aged 6 to 16) generally need between 1,600 and 3,200 calories a day. Those who consume healthy, well-balanced meals and snacks will get all the nutrients needed to perform well in sports, with no additional calories required. However, the timing of eating and exercising can impact on how children feel and perform during their chosen activity, as well as the balance of macro-nutrients consumed at each stage.

Before exercise

  • If children don’t eat anything at all before taking part in sports, they may lack energy and feel light headed. However, too much food can slow them down and make them feel unwell. It is therefore important to time food consumption right.
  • If children are consuming a full meal before exercise, this should be eaten around 2-3 hours prior to allow for adequate digestion. A small snack can be consumed around 30-60 minutes before exercise to help to top up energy levels.
  • It takes the body approximately four to six hours 20120531-154158-800x533to digest fat, around three hours to digest protein and about two hours to digest carbohydrates. It is therefore important that children focus on consuming mainly easily digestible carbohydrates directly before sports, so the body can focus on fuelling exercising muscles rather than digesting a heavy meal.
  • Making sure children are well hydrated before they start an exercise session is important, so encourage them to drink regularly throughout the day and with their pre-exercise meal. A sports drink is OK once in a while, but these drinks contain a lot of sugar and calories so water or diluted fruit juice is a better choice.

Food suggestions

  • An ideal pre-workout snack is a banana and a couple of oatcakes; this will provide a boost of energy without weighing children down. Bananas are also packed with potassium, which aids in maintaining proper nerve and muscle function
  • If eating several hours beforehand, a meal based around wholemeal pasta or brown rice with plenty of colourful vegetables is ideal. This is a great way to increase stored
    energy in the muscles and give children the extra oomph they need later in the day

During exercise

  • Game-Card-Glass-Vintage-GraphicsFairy001It is generally not necessary for children to consume food during exercise, unless they are participating in endurance or high intensity sports lasting over 60 minutes (such as long distance running or competitive swimming events). This is when carbohydrate stores may substantially decrease.
  • It is, however, important for children to consume plenty of fluids during exercise, especially if they are exercising in high temperatures. It is important not to wait until children are thirsty to allow them to drink, as this is a sign that they are already dehydrated.

After exercise

  • Children will often feel very hungry after exercise, and food and fluid intake is crucial for optimum recovery after sporting activities. After exercise carbohydrate stores will be lower, so it is important that they are replenished with a carbohydrate-rich meal –
    especially if the child is doing more exercise later on that day or the following day
  • The post-exercise meal should also include high
    quality, lean protein. Consuming this as soon as blafre20-294x300possible after exercise will be most beneficial for recovery, helping to repair exercise-induced damage to muscle fibres and help reduce soreness.
  • If children are unable to have a full meal after exercise, try to ensure they have a small snack that contains both carbohydrate and protein within the first 30-60 minutes to help begin the recovery process
  • To replace the fluid lost from sweating, it is vital to restore hydration levels as part of recovery, so remember to encourage children to keep drinking plenty of fluids after exercising

Food suggestions

  • A chicken sandwich or salad with sliced avocado or a piece of fruit and a handful of nuts are ideal post-sport snacks. Alternatively, a vegetable omelette or a baked potato with tuna or beans contains the perfect mix of carbohydrates and protein to help children get the most from their sporting activities.

© Sarah West Nutrition

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Get equipped

HEALTH:

On average only about 20% of us keep our New Year’s resolutions, with some of the biggest failures often found in fitness resolutions. But don’t let the statistics get you down: by following these tips you’ll be better equipped to succeed.

EXERCISE:

Rather than focusing on one ultimate end goal, try dissecting it into smaller pieces to make it seem less intimidating.

199213983487253074_XwUYjumA_cFor example, if your main objective is to complete a 10K race, your smaller goals could involve running a 5K in less than 30 minutes, adding upper and lower body strength training to increase your muscular endurance, or running 2 miles with a personal best completion time.

NUTRITION:

By keeping a well-stocked kitchen, you’ll be better equipped to keep up your healthy eating plans long term.

Cheap and easily available, beans (kidney, aduki, flageolet, mung, canellini, broad, haricot) and pulses (such as lentils) are high in protein and fibre but low in fat.  Keep a few cans in your cupboard, rinse thoroughly then add to salads, soups, casseroles and stir-fries for a nutritious boost.

© Sarah West Nutrition