Are you addicted?

HEALTH:

Scientists have found that over consumption of high-calorie food actually triggers an addiction-like response in the brain, encouraging people to crave even more sugar, salt-laden food.

If this sounds familiar, how can you break the cycle?

EXERCISE:

If you’re struggling with cravings, try changing your environment and doing something positive for yourself that will make you feel good.

478859372848550489_N8JygsMs_cA trip to the gym is ideal as it will not only relieve stress (another common junk food trigger) but can cause you to feel less hungry and more emotionally satisfied. You might be surprised at how quickly the craving evaporates.

NUTRITION:

Food combinations that include high amounts of salt and sugar are more stimulating, meaning that most people can’t limit themselves to suitable portions.

Foods that won’t trigger cravings are those that occur in nature, such as high fibre complex carbohydrates (i.e. wholegrains and vegetables) plus protein and small amounts of fat. By sticking to more natural foods you will find you feel much more in control of your choices.

© Sarah West Nutrition

Sugar hit

HEALTH:

The more sugar you consume, the greater the rise in blood sugar and consequently in insulin levels within the body.

Insulin not only converts sugar into an instant energy source, it also encourages the storage of fat. Keeping your blood sugar levels stable is therefore one of the most important factors in sustaining your energy levels and maintaining a healthy weight.

EXERCISE:

Research has shown that long-term, regular exercise can significantly improve the body’s ability to control fluctuating blood sugar levels.

During strenuous activity your body transports any available sugar directly to your muscles, thus helping to reduce excess sugar within the bloodstream (and preventing it from being stored as fat).

NUTRITION:

Try swapping white bread, white rice, white pasta and sugary cereals for nutrient-dense wholegrain alternatives which take longer to digest.

These foods release their sugar more slowly into your bloodstream, helping to reduce rapid insulin release and keep your energy levels and hunger under control.

 

© Sarah West Nutrition